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Selling the Southwest

In the 1930s, cash-for-crafts promised rural Hispanics a way to ease the transition to the dominant cash-based economy. The state of New Mexico established more than 40 craft schools, hoping that they would become village-owned craft cooperatives. The schools encouraged the production of Hispanic weaving and furniture. However, the market for Hispanic crafts proved to be much smaller than that for Native American goods. And the onset of the Great Depression prevented most of the schools from becoming profitable businesses.

 



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