HistoryWired About the Program Help Comments Smithsonian Institution
back
Log Cabin Campaign

The Log Cabin Campaign tapped the belief held by many Americans in the early 1800s that power in a democracy should not be restricted to a wealthy elite. During this era, requirements that voters own property began to be eliminated. But while voting rights spread among white working men--many of whom contributed to Harrison's landslide victory in 1840--these rights were still denied to women, free African Americans, Native Americans, and slaves.

 


William Henry Harrison, Ninth President, March-April 1841

William Henry Harrison was the son of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his grandson, Benjamin Harrison, would later become president. A hero of the battle of Tippecanoe, where he defeated Shawnee warriors and their chief Tecumseh, Harrison would unfortunately not have the opportunity to savor the popularity that got him elected president. After delivering the longest ever inaugural address on a very cold and windy March day, Harrison developed pneumonia and died exactly a month after his inauguration.

 


"The Harrison Yankee Doodle," William Henry Harrison campaign song

"The Harrison Yankee Doodle" from the recording entitled Presidential Campaign Songs 1789-1996, Folkways 45051, provided courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. © 1999. Used by permission.

Melody: "Yankee Doodle Dandy;" arranged by Oscar Brand/TRO-Hollis Music, Inc., BMI

Harrison’s Presidential campaigns were marked by hundreds of songs. "The Harrison Yankee Doodle" magnifies his military accomplishments using a familiar melody and celebrates the very rural "log cabin and hard cider" the previous song makes fun of.

Partial lyrics:
"Come swell the throng and join the song
Make the circle wider
Join the round for Harrison, Log Cabin and Hard Cider
With Harrison our country’s won
No treachery can divide her
Thy will be done
With Harrison, Log Cabin and Hard Cider …"

Lyrics to another William Henry Harrison campaign song:"What Has Caused This Great Commotion?"

Tune, "Little Pig's Tail"

"What has caused the great commotion, motion, motion,
Our country through?
It is the ball a rolling on, on.

Chorus

For Tippecanoe and Tyler too - Tippecanoe and Tyler too,
And with them we'll beat little Van, Van, Van.

Like the rushing of mighty waters, waters, waters,
On it will go,
And in its course will clear the way
For Tippecanoe and Tyler Too - Tippecanoe and Tyler too.

See the loco standard tottering, tottering, tottering,
Down it must go,
And in its place we'll rear the flag
Of Tippecanoe and Tyler Too - Tippecanoe and Tyler too.

Don't you hear from every quarter, quarter, quarter,
Good news and true,
That swift the ball is rolling on
For TippecanoeTyler Too - Tippecanoe and Tyler too.

The Buckeye boys turned out in thousands, thousands, thousands,
Not long ago,
And at Columbus set their seals,
To TippecanoeTyler Too - Tippecanoe and Tyler too."

 


 

Related Images

This banner uses the log cabin theme to reinforce the idea of the common man, many of whom contributed to Harrison's landslide victory in 1840.
Enlarge
This banner uses the log cabin theme to reinforce the idea of the common man, many of whom contributed to Harrison's landslide victory in 1840.


Start HistoryWired | About the Program | Help | Comments

Smithsonian Institution | Terms of Use | Privacy