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Offset Printing

In offset printing, a print is made from a stone or plate on a sheet of rubber, then transferred to paper. The elasticity of the rubber permits printing on hard unyielding surfaces such as metal. The tin printing process was patented in England by Robert Barclay in 1875. Several decades later, it was discovered that fine lithographs could be produced by the same process on dry paper and that it was no longer necessary to soften the paper by dampening it before printing.

 


Offset Lithography

Offset lithography is a planographic process combining the basic techniques of lithography and offset printing. A lithographic image is printed on a rubber blanket and transferred--or "offset"--from that to the paper. The process was first used in the late 1800s to print hand-drawn stipple lithography on tin. Now it is almost entirely confined to photolithography and is used for printing on a variety of hard or textured surfaces, as well as for fast web printing on paper.

 

 



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