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Ambrotypes and Tintypes

Patented in 1854, the ambrotype was a glass negative backed with black material that enabled it to appear as a positive image. It was made in portrait studios as the daguerreotype had been, but at a lower cost. Even less expensive was the tintype, which substituted an iron plate for glass. Tintypes were the most readily available form of location portraiture used during the Civil War.

 

Related Images

Ambrotype portrait of Tak-bi-tsa-kish
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Ambrotype portrait of Tak-bi-tsa-kish
Tintype portrait of unidentified Pawnee man
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Tintype portrait of unidentified Pawnee man


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