HistoryWired About the Program Help Comments Smithsonian Institution
back
Stubby

Stubby joined the 102nd Infantry, 26th (Yankee) Division, at Yale Field, New Haven, CT, in the spring of 1917. It is not known where he came from or what his pedigree was, but he appeared to be several weeks old at the time of his arrival. Throughout his service, his caretaker was J. Robert Conroy. In July 1917, he was smuggled aboard the S.S. Minnesota at Newport News, VA, and sailed to France with his unit. Following winter training of his unit, Stubby went to the front and was in the trenches February 5, 1918. He participated in 17 engagements in four World War I offensives (Aisne-Marne, Champagne-Marne, St. Mihiel, and Meuse Argonne). After the Armistice, Stubby met President Woodrow Wilson when the President visited the 102nd Infantry regiment in France on Christmas Day 1918. When Stubby's unit returned to the United States in 1919, the dog was again smuggled aboard ship for the return trip.

Stubby participated in many veterans' parades in many cities and attended every American Legion convention until his death. He appeared in a series of vaudeville shows in 1919 on the same bill with Mary Pickford. He visited the White House in 1921 to meet President Harding and again in 1924 to meet President Coolidge. In 1921, General John J. Pershing awarded a gold medal to Stubby. In 1922-23, Stubby was official mascot of Georgetown University while his master was attending law school.

Stubby died in 1926, and his remains were preserved with technical assistance from the Smithsonian Institution. A plaster cast was made of his body, his skin was mounted on the cast, and his cremated remains were interred within the cast. For many years, he was on display at the National Red Cross Museum. On May 22, 1956, his master, J. Robert Conroy, presented Stubby to the Smithsonian. Included with the gift were a brass-studded collar, a leather harness, a scrapbook containing the history of Stubby, and a chamois blanket decorated with various badges, medals, and insignia of World War I.

 

Related Images

Stubby with General Pershing
Enlarge
Stubby with General Pershing

Enlarge
"Stubby, Life Member of the American Red Cross, soliciting members for the Red Cross"
Stubby and his buddies leading a Legion Parade
Enlarge
Stubby and his buddies leading a Legion Parade"
Stubby wearing the chamois coat made by the women of Chateau-Thierry
Enlarge
Stubby wearing the chamois coat made by the women of Chateau-Thierry


Start HistoryWired | About the Program | Help | Comments

Smithsonian Institution | Terms of Use | Privacy