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Hair chaps
 
Audio

"I Ride an Old Paint"
From "Peter La Farge Sings of the Cowboys"
© Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Audio

"Cattle Calls"
From "Peter La Farge Sings of the Cowboys"
© Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Pair of Cowboy Hair Chaps
about 1920

"Woolies"
Gerhard Miller, Jr. bought this pair of Angora goat-hide chaps around 1920. They were made by J.M. Capriola of Elka, NV. Chaps, from the Mexican-Spanish "chaparreras," are leather leg coverings of various styles worn by working buckaroos when riding in brush or sage, for warmth in the winter and for "show" in rodeos or parades. There are several different styles: "woolies" (or "hair chaps"), "shotguns," and "batwings," reflecting different regional traditions as well as changing fashions and personal preferences. The newest style--popular for more than 50 years--is called "chinks." Chinks are short, fringed chaps that reach below the knee and are often open behind the leg.

Notes
38-1/2" long x 13-1/2" wide (width of each leg)
Angora goat hide
Web display only

Learn more!
· Cowboy Clothing
· "I Ride an Old Paint"
· "Cattle Calls"

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